A minimalist drinks coffee

According to what I have observed, the average, modern minimalist/hipster type is a serious coffee snob.

You may, as an example, have seen The Minimalists promote the coffee house they co-own in Florida, or noticed how all minimalist community meetings are held in coffee houses that serves a top-of-the-line Americano.

But I actually think that this whole coffee fascination fits badly into the simple living ideology.
I get the feeling that many simplicity advocates, take all the money they save from living frugally and reallocates them into a new espresso machine, that can apply the perfect amount of pressure to the coffee-making process.

Thereafter comes the reoccurring extra expenses from supplying oneself with single-estate organic coffee from Kenya, that is so sour that only the supreme connoisseur can enjoy it.

This is not to say, that I am against coffee as a hobby. I just see it used as a tool for signaling that you are part of the group way too often.

And as with everything else, the danger of becoming a connoisseur is that you loose the ability to enjoy an average tasting/feeling/looking product. You loose the ability to see how privileged you are, when you drink an average cup of coffee, compared to what options people had available 100 years ago.

The author, Ryan Holiday, explains it so nicely when he says that he refuses to fly first class because he knows how that soon will be the new norm for him.

The bottom line is, I personally try not to get too heavily into the coffee universe, even though I love coffee. I have tried it, but I have also noticed how much self-deception and placebo effect is involved – just like with wine.

 

How I do

I have even experimented a lot with my own brewing techniques, and found that the way they do it on Bali is the best and simplest one.

The Balinese people simply grinds the beans into an extremely fine texture, put about 1.5 teaspoons of the grounds in a cup, dump boiling water on it and stir.

After a few minutes, the grounds falls to the bottom of the cup, and you are ready to drink – just make sure you stop drinking a little earlier than you normally would, to avoid eating the grounds.

There are 3 reasons why I love making coffee this way:

  1. The coffee is unfiltered, which means you keep the precious coffee oils, that both taste good and have some cool effects on your health.
  2. The method is very efficient, in terms how many beans it requires.
  3. The coffee can be made without any equipment, which means you can make your coffee on the road, and you won’t have to buy any kind of machine for it.

This is, by my standards, the best way to drink coffee as a minimalist.

Udgivet af

Max Micheelsen

I'm a simplifier, Love efficiency in all forms, Beleive in a slow lifestyle, enabled via smart solutions

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